Hugman Sites Tour

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In recognition of Hugman’s vision for the River Walk, the City of San Antonio has installed more than fifty bronze plaques identifying original Hugman-designed features. The bronze plaque replicates the architectural seal used on Hugman’s original drawings.

Look for the Hugman Bronze Seals at the points designated on the map. Along the way, you will also see smaller bronze seals that indicate additional Hugman features.



1. South Flood Gate

1. South Flood Gate

This South Flood Gate had an original joint purpose of serving as a dam. As the Great Bend wound downstream from where is now the North Flood Gate, the riverbed dropped seven feet from the start...
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2. Mill Bridge

2. Mill Bridge

This is historically the widest place along the Great Bend, and remains so. A dam once held water that powered a mill above the northern bank, as recalled in the colorful WPA tile mural by Ethel...
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3. Hugman Bench

3. Hugman Bench

This section of the River Walk was intended by its designer to be park-like and serene, a place of contemplation for those seeking refuge from the busy streets above. In addition to the heavy...
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4. Rosita's Bridge

4. Rosita's Bridge

This is one of two River Walk bridges designed by Robert Hugman. It was named in 1992 in honor of Rosita Fernandez, who crossed it during her twenty-six years of singing—often in...
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5. Market Street Stairway

5. Market Street Stairway

Bridges directly across the river were in short supply when Robert Hugman’s River Walk was completed, requiring use of street bridges above. The walkway south along the western bank of the...
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6. Hugman Office

6. Hugman Office

In the early 1940s architect Robert Hugman pioneered the River Walk’s commercial use by opening his office in basement of the tower of this 1891 landmark designed by James Riely Gordon....
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7. The "Floating" Bridge

7. The "Floating" Bridge

One of the design challenges facing Robert Hugman was how to devise a walkway around the sharp turn beneath the North Presa Street bridge and its close supporting walls. His solution was to build...
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8. Fountain

8. Fountain

The hotel above incorporates original buildings of St. Mary’s College, a Catholic school for boys that opened in 1853 and evolved into St. Mary’s University. Drainage and air...
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9. Hugman Bridge

9. Hugman Bridge

If gondolas were to be the River Walk’s mode of water transportation, level bridges from one side to the other would simply not do. Bridges had to be high enough so a standing gondolier...
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10. North Flood Gate

10. North Flood Gate

Two major flood control projects protect the River Walk. Two miles upstream, Olmos Dam, completed in 1926, holds back the most threatening storm runoff. Some 150 feet beneath this spot runs a...
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11. Cantilevered Walk

11. Cantilevered Walk

Commercial development close to the busy Houston Street bridge did not allow space for construction of direct stairway access to the level of the River Walk. The solution was to cantilever a...
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12 Hugman Dam

12 Hugman Dam

This marks the northern terminus of the River Walk designed by Robert Hugman. The dam was built to raise the level of water upstream and drop the level on downstream to the southern terminus, thus...
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